American Elephants


Political Correctness Run Amok! by The Elephant's Child

Potential-illegal-guns-in-schools-cartoon

The image at center top is the remains of a PopTart after 7-year-old Josh tried to chew it into the shape of a mountain, just for fun, at Park Elementary School in the Baltimore area. His teacher spotted it, with tiny bits of red strawberry filling oozing out, and recognized it instantly as a dangerous weapon.

Josh’s dad was surprised to receive a telephone call from the school saying that Josh had  been suspended from school for two days because he chewed his breakfast pastry into — the shape of a gun? He was astounded at the harsh punishment for his seven-year-old.

The school made sure that counseling is available for any students traumatized by the frightening toaster strudel ordeal.

The school sent home a letter to parents saying, “During breakfast this morning, one of our students used food to make inappropriate gestures that disrupted the class. While no physical threats were made and no one was harmed, the student had to be removed from the classroom.”

Parents should talk to their children if they’re troubled by the incident, the school said, and the school counselor will be available for any student who needs to talk.

If any students were traumatized, it was probably from observing that their teacher and their principal were stark raving loons, and in charge of their destiny.

The letter that went home with students described the incident:

Dear Parents and Guardians:

I am writing to let you know about an incident that occurred this morning in one of our classrooms and encourage you to discuss this matter with your child in a manner you deem most appropriate.

During breakfast this morning, one of our students used food to make inappropriate gestures that disrupted the class. While no physical threats were made and no one [was] harmed, the student had to be removed from the classroom.

As you are aware, the … Code of Student Conduct and appropriate consequences related to violations of the code are clearly spelled out in the Student Handbook, which was sent home during the first week of school and can be found on our website, http://www.aacps.org….

If your children express that they are troubled by today’s incident, please talk with them and help them share their feelings. Our school counselor is available to meet with any students who have the need to do so next week. In general, please remind them of the importance of making good choices.

Economist Daniel Mitchell is appalled by these examples of behavior by adults who work in government schools. He offers these contestants for  the Stupid Official  of the Year Award:

ADDENDUM: From Instapundit today:

IT’S COME TO THIS: ‘Toaster Pastry Gun Freedom Act’ proposed in Maryland. “A Maryland state senator has crafted a bill to curb the zeal of public school officials who are tempted to suspend students as young as kindergarten for having things — or talking about things, or eating things — that represent guns, but aren’t actually anything like real guns.”

And I love this: “The bill also includes a section mandating counseling for school officials who fail to distinguish between guns and things that resemble guns.” Seems fair. We’re always told that public education is important because it fosters critical thinking, but critical thinking seems to be in short supply among public educators.

 



Bureaucracy At Work, Nobody In Charge. by The Elephant's Child

Hurricane SandyIIBureaucracy is alive and at work on the other side of the country. Homeowners in an exclusive waterfront neighborhood in Brooklyn thought it was as bad as it could get when the storm surge from Hurricane Sandy hit. Many have yet to return to their damaged homes. Others have spent thousands repairing the damage to their homes.

The city, obeying a New York state approved capped five-year formula for setting assessment levels has hiked the assessed valuations on their homes significantly. Their property-value notices, pre-dated January 15, didn’t arrive until the first week of February informing homeowners that they had until Feb. 1 to apply for assistance through the Finance Department’s new Hurricane  Sandy Property Tax Relief program. Finance Department spokesman Owen Stone said the deadline had  been pushed back to Feb. 15, but the program has been in operation since late November.

This is what happens in a bureaucracy. The rules say the houses have appreciated in value. It occurs to no one that that neighborhood was the one they’ve been watching on television with all the storm damage. If damaged  home valuations did occur to anyone, who has the authority to order a change to the state mandated appraisal increases? It is all just so complicated, and fines are waiting to be levied on those who don’t respond quickly enough.

One oceanfront home still had its windows and doors boarded up, and the owner has yet to return because the home was so badly damaged by Sandy. Common sense would dictate their property values have fallen, but the city says the home’s market value has jumped by $473,000 during the past year to $3.1 million.

Well, good luck to them all.  Spokesman Owen Stone said his agency is reviewing 2,900 applications citywide, and that sounds like it doesn’t include all those folks who just got their notices.



Life Is Uncertain. Don’t Be Afraid to Take Charge. by The Elephant's Child
March 2, 2012, 6:33 pm
Filed under: Politics | Tags: , ,

This was a post from Small Dead Animals, a Canadian blog.

Reported in the U.K. Daily Mail:

41-year-old Simon Burgess was feeding swans in a shallow pond in Walpole Park in Gosport, England last year when he suffered an epileptic seizure and fell unconscious into the water. Twenty-five emergency personnel arrived on scene but Burgess remained floating face down, twenty-five feet from shore, for over half an hour after the first responders arrived.

Even though they could all swim, the first fire crew to arrive hadn’t been ‘trained’ to enter water higher than ankle-deep. Instead they waited for ‘specialists’ to arrive to retrieve his body. They had decided Mr Burgess must surely be dead because he had been in the water for ten minutes. When a policeman decided to go in anyway, he was ordered not to. A paramedic was also told not to enter the water because he didn’t have the right ‘protective’ clothing and might be in breach of the Personal Protective Equipment at Work Regulations 1992.

The tragic incident made headlines around the world, held up as a shocking example of ludicrously risk-averse Britain. And it prompted a coroner to demand that fire, police and ambulance services improve training to prevent a repeat.

The paper discovered that:

  • The ‘ankle-deep’ rule was meant for fast-flowing water and is taken from guidelines drawn up to deal with floods.
  • Other rescue agencies believe people can survive submerged for much longer than ten minutes – some will still try resuscitation at 90 minutes.
  • The incident happened despite  a previous reassurance from the Health and Safety Executive that firefighters would not face prosecution if they performed acts of heroism that break rules.
  • Mr Burgess could have been reached within two minutes of emergency crews arriving at the scene – as proved by our reporter who went into the lake and waded 25ft to the spot where his body had been floating.
Political correctness is a blight on western nations. You must not offend anyone, you must obey the rules and regulations down to the last comma. The most remarkable thing is that we don’t seem to know what to do about it. We mostly recognize it as a great mistake, we snort and cluck over the stupidity, but what do we do? Nothing. It infects all bureaucracies, large or small. Human Resource departments are a source and are boosters. It involves “Don’t blame me,” and “It’s not my fault,” and “I followed the rules.”

We need a big dose of taking responsibility. The world does not end if you say “I made a mistake.”


In Britain, the NHS is Starving its Patients. Are We Next? by The Elephant's Child

We frequently include stories here about Britain’s National Health Service.  Britain has had socialized medicine since just after World War II. Some call them “scare stories” and so they are. Many Britons like their National Health Service, and feel that they get good treatment.  The scare stories are compelling.  Why do we include them?  Britons hate it when we use their NHS as a bad example; and they, in turn, use their idea of American medicine as a bad example.

Much of health care is routine and minor. You can’t judge health care by the occasional broken arm or deep cut.  Most anyone can fix it. You have to judge health care by the very sick,  the elderly in failing health, the difficult diseases, and the chronic disease. The well don’t need health care. So the real customers for health care are probably in poor health.  And the question of quality becomes how do we care for those in poor health?

The goal of socialized medicine is to give good health care to the poor — those who cannot pay the usual cost of good health care.  The theory is that they will save enough money elsewhere to afford to give good care to the poor.  But are we talking about routine care for healthy poor people, or the care for poor people in poor health?

There is an assumption that “preventative care” will prevent people from getting any condition that is expensive.  This is nonsense. Diagnostic medicine is expensive.  A single blood draw may result in a whole battery of tests.  Machines like MRIs and C–T scanners cost a fortune.  A diagnosis usually begins with a symptom and the attempt to discover the cause of the symptom. Running tests on people who have no symptoms is not usually cost-effective.

What about the modern epidemic of obesity?  A few years ago, they changed the standards for what was called obesity to include more of those people who had never been called obese before.  Voilá, and “epidemic” of obesity.  The same thing happened with diabetes.  They lowered the standards sharply to include more people, and there was suddenly an “epidemic” of diabetes.  The intent was to get more people treated early, but the idea that everybody had better stop eating Big Macs or anything that tasted good was probably misguided.

The Wall Street Journal today has a postcard from the NHS. In 2007, 230 patients died of malnutrition in British hospitals, the latest year for which figures are available.  Age UK, a monitoring charity, says “the true figure may be much higher” due to under-reporting.  In 2007-2008, 148,946 Britons entered hospitals suffering from malnutrition and 157,175 left in that state, meaning that hospitals released 8,220 people worse-off nutritionally than when they entered.  In 2008-2009, that worse-off figure was up to 10,443.

The problem is not insufficient food.  It is individualized mealtime assistance.  The constant scarcities created by socialized medicine, and the constant drive to cut costs leaves nurses with more responsibilities and less time.  It is not, the Journal points out, a Labour problem or a Tory problem.  It is a single-payer health-care problem.

It is a problem of bureaucracy. Anyone who has worked in an organization of any size recognizes that the bigger the bureaucracy, the greater the problems.  Group think doesn’t work. And the more remote the bureaucrats from the actual sick person, the worse the system will be.   Examine this chart (click where noted to enlarge) and note the stubby yellowish star in the lower right-hand corner.  That represents you the sick person.  All the rest of the bubbles and squares and rectangles represent not individual people, but bureaus, who are making decisions about what treatment you get and whether their decisions will allow you to live or die. Not you.  Not your doctor.  Hundreds and hundreds of faceless bureaucrats.

Democrats are facing a nationwide backlash.  Democratic congressional candidates have a new message for voters.  We know you don’t like ObamaCare, so we will fix it.  Do not believe them. Endless tinkering does not fix anything.  It is a single-payer health-care problem.  It does not work. The inevitable result is the NHS — which is what the ObamaCare people want.  They have said so.



The Onion Strikes Again: Are Tests Biased Against Students Who Don’t Give a Sh*T? by The Elephant's Child
August 29, 2010, 8:35 am
Filed under: Education, Entertainment, Humor, Politics, Statism | Tags: , ,

When the folks at The Onion do a parody, there is often a germ of truth that makes the whole thing so hysterical.  This almost seems as if they could have sat in on this very earnest discussion or possibly even the education department study.  They have the nuances of the conversation just right, and so convincing.  This is quite delicious.  Don’t miss it.  (Language alert!  It’s The Onion)



The Same People Who Claim Obamacare Will Make Your Healthcare More Efficient and More Affordable?… by American Elephant

…are the same people who need 26 pages to write a recipe for brownies:

3.2.5.3 Nuts, walnuts, shelled. Shelled walnut pieces shall be of the small piece size classification, shall be of a light color, and shall be U.S. No. 1 of the U.S. Standards for Shelled English Walnuts. A minimum of 90 percent, by weight, of the pieces shall pass through a 4/16-inch diameter round hole screen and not more than 1 percent, by weight, shall pass through a 2/16-inch diameter round hole screen. the shelled walnuts shall be coated with an approved food grade antioxidant and shall be of the latest season’s crop….[read the whole recipe (if you're a glutton for punishment)]

Which is why even the CBO has stopped pretending that Obamacare is going to be anything but vastly less efficient and vastly more expensive — as everything that government does always is.

The good news? Americans’ overwhelming opposition to Obamacare is not abating, and a whopping 63% of likely voters favor repeal.

(h/t Reason)



Bureaucracy and Tyranny. a Diagnosis. by The Elephant's Child
May 13, 2010, 7:11 pm
Filed under: Capitalism, Democrat Corruption, Economy, Law, Politics | Tags: , ,

“Bureaucracy” is, to many of us — the enemy.  Alex J. Pollock elucidates at the Enterprise Blog at The American Enterprise Institute:

We tend to think of “bureaucracy” as meaning sluggish, complicated, unresponsive paperwork and process. But it has another, more threatening meaning: Rule by the bureaucrats, just as “aristocracy” is rule by the aristocrats—in other words, rule by unelected officers who impose their ideas on you, but cannot be voted out by you or anyone else. Bureaucracy in this sense has an inherent love of power and yearning for authority which cannot be questioned.

Consider the recent activities of the Securities and Exchange Commission.

The SEC criticized Goldman Sach’s synthetic CMO deal. Whatever one may think of the merits of the deal, should you be able to disagree with an attack on you by a bureaucracy? Goldman Sachs publicly disagreed. The SEC got the Justice Department to open a criminal investigation. Warren Buffett defended Goldman Sachs. The SEC announced it was investigating inadequate disclosures by Buffett’s company.

Coincidence? Or a message that you will certainly be punished if you dare to disagree with the bureaucrats?

The Founding Fathers well described “swarms of officers sent hither to harass the people.” It is worth pondering how bureaucracy may have inside it a tyranny trying to get out.



Great Moments in the Green Bureaucracy’s Regulatory Adventures. by The Elephant's Child
May 7, 2010, 7:30 am
Filed under: Environment, Humor, Junk Science, Law | Tags: , ,

Henry Payne recounted this delightful classic —  reprinted by the Mackinac Center —  in Planet Gore at National Review.

The Michigan Department of Environmental Quality, a hapless bureaucracy in Michigan’s capital city, with careful attention to the rules and regulations of  Part 301, Inland Lakes and Streams, of the Natural Resource and Environmental Protection Act, Act 451 of the Public Acts of 1994.  Here is the DEQ letter to a private landowner reprinted in all its indignant, bureaucratic fury.

DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY
LANSING MI 48909-7973
December 17, 1997
CERTIFIED

Mr. Ryan DeVries
2088 Dagget
Pierson, MI 49339

Dear Mr. DeVries:

SUBJECT: DEQ File No. 97-59-0023-1 T11N, R10W, Sec. 20, Montcalm County

It has come to the attention of the Department of Environmental Quality that there has been recent unauthorized activity on the above referenced parcel of property.  You have been certified as the legal landowner and/or contractor who did the following unauthorized activity: Construction and maintenance of two wood debris dams across the outlet stream of Spring Pond.

A permit must be issued prior to the start of this type of activity. A review of the Department’s files show that no permits have been issued. Therefore, the Department has determined that this activity is in violation of Part 301, Inland Lakes and Streams, of the Natural Resource and Environmental Protection Act, Act 451 of the Public Acts of 1994, being sections 324.30101 to 324.30113 of the Michigan Compiled Laws annotated.

The Department has been informed that one or both of the dams partially failed during a recent rain event, causing debris dams and flooding at downstream locations.  We find that dams of this nature are inherently hazardous and cannot be permitted. The Department therefore orders you to cease and desist all unauthorized activities at this location, and to restore the stream to a free-flow condition by removing all wood and brush forming the dams from the stream channel.  All restoration work shall be completed no later than January 31, 1998.  Please notify this office when the restoration has been completed so that a follow-up site inspection may be scheduled by our staff.

Failure to comply with this request, or any further unauthorized activity on the site, may result in this case being referred for elevated enforcement action.

We anticipate and would appreciate your full cooperation in this matter.  Please feel free to contact me at this office if you have any questions.

Sincerely,
David L. Price
District Representative
Land and Water Management Division


The Michigan Department of Environmental Quality’s infamous regulatory war against beaver dams — the clueless, indignant bureaucrats had probably never seen a beaver.  They’re really kind of cute.  And they will never, never live this one down.



The Tyranny of Bureaucracy, or Death by a Thousand Threads. by The Elephant's Child

Conservatives praise the free market.  Liberals prefer big government, and many simply do not understand what the fuss is all about.

Alexis de Tocqueville explained it many years ago in his masterpiece Democracy in America. Tocqueville saw the transformation of a free society, not in melodramatic terms like a military coup, but as a slow, creeping death.  The power of the centralized government will gradually expand, meddling in the tiniest corners of our lives.  We will be immobilized, like Gulliver, by innumerable rules and regulations, hundreds of annoying little restrictions that become more and more binding until eventually we are paralyzed.

Subjection in minor affairs breaks out every day and is felt by the whole community indiscriminately.  It does not drive men to resistance, but it crosses them at every turn, till they are led to surrender the exercise of their own will.  Thus their spirit is gradually broken and their character enervated…

Tocqueville describes the new tyranny as “an immense and tutelary power,” and its task is to watch over us all, and regulate every aspect of our lives.

It covers the surface of society with a network of small complicated rules, minute and uniform, through which the most original minds and the most energetic characters cannot penetrate, to rise above the crowd.

We are to be seduced.  American democracy will end not with bludgeons, but with the emergence of a vast welfare state that manages all the details of our lives and corrupts our character.

The…sole condition required in order to succeed in centralizing the supreme power in a democratic community is to love equality, or to get men to believe you love it.  Thus the science of despotism, which was once so complex, is simplified, and reduced, as it were, to a single principle.

I came across a story, of all things, about a maker of bourbon.  A company went “green”, but not as demanded by the EPA.  Not forced by a mass of regulations and mandates devised by environmental  busybodies or by rules passed by Congress “for the children”.  Maker’s Mark was faced with the challenge of how to dispose of the spent grains from the distillery process.  They turned to a firm called Ecovation.  Do read the story of what they did with the thick slop that was once a refuse product.

Innovation?  The government will produce innovation.  They will create an agency, or perhaps a committee or a commission. They will appropriate funds, issue directions, establish rules, add  mandates, a schedule, and a vast chain of command, a hierarchy that must approve each step.  Something may be created, but it won’t be innovative or creative, for the impulse for innovation is stamped out by petty nitpicking, and bureaucracy is the home ground of petty nitpicking.  In a hierarchical organization the next one up on the ladder must approve, so that the one on the next rung will approve.  And so on, and so on.  It is how societies die.

That is what the fuss is all about.



Extraordinary Adventures in Bureaucracy. by The Elephant's Child
October 2, 2009, 1:15 am
Filed under: Domestic Policy, Freedom, Law | Tags: , , ,

• The AP reported on a letter sent to Lisa Snyder, a suburban mom, by the Michigan Department of Human Services. She was warned to stop watching her neighbors’ children while they waited in the mornings for the school bus. Ms. Snyder was kind enough to do this as a favor for her friends who are working mothers.  Preliminary reports do not indicate whether the warning letter was backed by possible criminal penalties.

• Small-time entrepreneur and inventor Krister Evertson of Wasilla, Alaska was arrested at gunpoint by SWAT-clad FBI agents.  He was unaware that he had to put a federally mandated sticker on his otherwise lawful UPS package.

• A few years ago, Kay Leibrand, a 63 year-old grandmother was arrested by police at her home of 30 years in Palo Alto, California.  She had failed to meet some bureaucrat’s ruling on how high her hedges should be.

• Retiree George Norris, 66 years old, had his house ransacked by armed agents of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.  His home-based business was cultivating, importing, and selling orchids.  He ended up serving two years in prison, finally getting free of federal supervision last December — at the age of 71, for what amounted to paperwork violations.

In July, a bipartisan hearing was held by Chairman Bobby Scott (D-VA) and ranking member Louie Gohmert (R-TX), where both Krister Evertson and George Norris’ wife Kathy testified.  Scott is Chairman of the subcommittee on Crime, Terrorism and Homeland Security, so I suppose that’s it, though it seems a little excessive for a missing sticker and incorrect  paperwork.

What is clear is that poorly drafted legislation or overbroad laws can be used to turn ordinary Americans law-abiding lives into a police-state nightmare.   Lawmakers need to spend as much time eliminating bad laws and making sure that the new laws that they are drafting cannot be used so irresponsibly against innocent people.

Jennifer Granholm, Michigan’s Governor, has quickly called for amendments to the law that her Department of Human Services used to threaten Lisa Snyder for not having registered as a daycare with the state.

Thanks to “The Foundry” at the Heritage Foundation for this story.



More Tales From the Crypt, er, National Health Service. by The Elephant's Child

A search is on for the source of a maggot infestation in the operating theaters of the Royal Children’s Hospital in Aberdeen.  The discovery has caused the closure of three operating rooms, and postponement of procedures.

Two “decontamination cleans” have been carried out, and surgical procedures are scheduled to go ahead on Monday and Tuesday.

The general manager of child health services, said: (bureaucratic language alert!) “I can reassure parents that at no time were any children at risk of coming into contact with the maggots.”…

“Clearly infestation of this kind is very unpleasant, and our advisers will continue to try throughout the day to identify the source.  I am satisfied this is not a reflection on staff or standards of cleanliness in the hospital.”

Yes, this is a scare story  from the United Kingdom.  But in spite of the theater of Mr. Obama’s Health Care town halls, he and his advisers are already talking about rationing.  Old people nearing their statistical life expectancy should not expect anything expensive.  There is  a reason why the “town halls” are filled with Obama supporters, the questions are submitted in advance, no dissent or criticism or unpleasant questions are allowed.

President Obama talks about saving money, better care, everyone insured, but this is nonsense, once again.  A major way to reduce costs is to bring some sanity to medical liability.  Doctors’ costs for liability insurance are astronomical.  The cost is high because of “pain and suffering” awards.  That is, if a doctor, for example, cuts off the wrong leg, ordinary damages should make the victim of malpractice whole.

“Pain and suffering” damages, which supposedly recompense you for your unhappy feelings, are where trial lawyers make their outrageous fees and where they earned their sleazy reputations. A limit on the amount of such awards might stop trial lawyers from “channeling dead children” to arouse sympathy.

Much of President Obama’s financial support comes from trial lawyers.  There will be no limits on trial lawyers.  Which is why Obama was booed at his American Medical Association speech.



Newspeak: cultural cancer in the brave new world by The Elephant's Child
December 8, 2008, 9:14 pm
Filed under: Education, Freedom, History, Socialism | Tags: , , ,

From The Times in London:

Traditional subjects such as history, geography and religious studies will be removed from the primary school curriculum and merged into a “human, social and environmental” learning programme as part of a series of education reforms.

Under the plans, information technology classes would be given as much prominence as literacy and numeracy, and foreign languages would be taught in tandem with English.

The reforms are the most sweeping for 20 years and aim to slim down the curriculum so that younger children can be taught fewer subjects in greater depth.

Sir Jim Rose, author of the interim report to be published today said that the changes were aimed at producing a curriculum for the 21st century.

Why is it always “for the 21st century?” You can always tell that it is a really sappy program if they have to tell you that it is new and fresh by identifying as century appropriate.  And be sure to indoctrinate the kiddies in environmentalism, so they can turn in their parents if they don’t recycle.

Teachers get really bored teaching the same thing over and over. A new batch of little kids, and you have to start over teaching them their letters and beginning reading and beginning numeracy again.  Computers are more fun.

I suspect we were far better off back when we had teacher’s colleges that offered a two year course in how to teach elementary school children to read, write and cipher with a little beginning science, geography and history thrown in.

Schools are no longer teaching kids basic math because now the kids can do it on a calculator.  They are just poorly equipped to figure out the tip on a bill in a restaurant or make change if the power goes off or even add, subtract or multiply if they don’t have their calculator at hand.  Schools no longer teach cursive writing because kids will mostly use a keyboard.  But children cannot write a simple thank you note, as you have perhaps noticed.  When was the last time a sales clerk (excuse me, sales associate) counted your change back to you?

The 10,000 word Oxford Junior Dictionary published by Oxford University Press is intended for the use of UK schoolchildren, large numbers of whom are increasingly not English.  Words considered no longer useful for children have been removed, words related the Christmas like “carol, holly, ivy, mistletoe,” fantasy words such as “dwarf, elf, goblin” or words related to Christianity  such as “altar, bishop, chapel, minister, monastery, monk, nun, psalm, saint or devil,” and even such ordinary English animals like “piglet, magpie, starling, weasel or wren.”  They have been replaced with words like “blog, broadband, MP3 player, voicemail, chatroom and celebrity.”  How very, very important that an English child should know the word “celebrity.”

Roger Kimball also discusses language today.

Last winter, Department of Homeland Security issued a document called “Terminology to Define the Terrorists: Recommendations form American Muslims.”  While you ponder why the Department of Homeland Security is gathering recommendations about how to combat radical Islam from American Muslims, let me mention a few things this document recommends.

Because we are supposed to be “communicating with, not confronting,” Muslims, the document advises us not to “insult or confuse them with pejorative terms such as ‘Islamo-fascism’ which are considered offensive by many Muslims.”  The word “progress ” is OK, but — George Orwell where are you? — “the experts consulted” rejected the word “liberty” “because many around the world would discount the term as a buzzword for American hegemony.”

He goes on to say:

While emissaries from the State Department and the Department of Homeland Security are making Herculean efforts not to do or say anything to “offend Muslims,” radical Muslims are busy extending the list of things they are offended by while also seeking new ways to  insinuate elements of Sharia law into the West — a mode of theocratic imposition that, far from being “fully compatible” with secular democracy, is something close to its antithesis.

Do read the whole thing, linked above.

It is time to reread George Orwell’s 1984 and familiarize yourself once again with “Newspeak”.   There is a disease abroad in our bureaucracies that seems to involve a worm in the brain.  Highly contagious apparently.




Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 6,508 other followers

%d bloggers like this: