American Elephants


Way too Late to Apologize! by The Elephant's Child
July 4, 2010, 6:39 pm
Filed under: Freedom, Heartwarming, History | Tags: , , ,

(h/t: Maggie’s Farm)



Just What Do You Really Know About the Revolution? by The Elephant's Child

Take a look at the cool website of the day, The American Revolution CenterExplore their collection, and the timeline of the struggle.

The Center commissioned the first national survey to assess adult knowledge of the American Revolution.  Ninety percent of Americans think that knowledge of the American Revolution and the principles that have united all Americans is very important.

89 percent of Americans expected to pass a test on basic knowledge of the Revolution, but they scored an average of 44 percent.  You can take the test here, to see what you know about the War of Independence, and there’s a reading list so you can bone up.  Enjoy.



The Very Best Fourth of July Speech Ever! by The Elephant's Child
July 4, 2010, 5:06 pm
Filed under: Capitalism, Freedom, History | Tags: , ,

One of the best Independence Day speeches ever was given by Calvin Coolidge, the 30th President of the United States, at the Celebration of the 150th Anniversary of the Declaration of Independence in Philadelphia. Do read the whole thing, better yet, download it. Here are a few excerpts:

It was not because it was proposed to establish a new nation, but because it was proposed to establish a nation on new principles, that July 4, 1776, has come to be regarded as one of the greatest days in history. Great ideas do not burst upon the world unannounced. They are reached by a gradual development over a length of time usually proportionate to their importance. This is especially true of the principles laid down in the Declaration of Independence. Three very definite propositions were set out in its preamble regarding the nature of mankind and therefore of government. These were the doctrine that all men are created equal, that they are endowed with certain inalienable rights, and that therefore the source of the just powers of government must be derived from the consent of the governed.

If no one is to be accounted as born into a superior station, if there is to be no ruling class, and if all possess rights which can neither be bartered away nor taken from them by any earthly power, it follows as a matter of course that the practical authority of the Government has to rest on the consent of the governed. While these principles were not altogether new in political action, and were very far from new in political speculation, they had never been assembled before and declared in such a combination. But remarkable as this may be, it is not the chief distinction of the Declaration of Independence. The importance of political speculation is not to be underestimated, as I shall presently disclose. Until the idea is developed and the plan made there can be no action.

It was the fact that our Declaration of Independence containing these immortal truths was the political action of a duly authorized and constituted representative public body in its sovereign capacity, supported by the force of general opinion and by the armies of Washington already in the field, which makes it the most important civil document in the world. It was not only the principles declared, but the fact that therewith a new nation was born which was to be founded upon those principles and which from that time forth in its development has actually maintained those principles, that makes this pronouncement an incomparable event in the history of government. It was an assertion that a people had arisen determined to make every necessary sacrifice for the support of these truths and by their practical application bring the War of Independence to a successful conclusion and adopt the Constitution of the United States with all that it has meant to civilization.

Calvin Coolidge was our only president born on the Fourth of July.  He was also a firm believer in Liberty and low taxes.  here he is, expressing those ideas in what is believed to be “the first presidential film with sound recording.”  These remarks from the conclusion of his Fourth of July speech seem especially appropriate today:

Under a system of popular government there will always be those who will seek for political preferment by clamoring for reform. While there is very little of this which is not sincere, there is a large portion that is not well informed. In my opinion very little of just criticism can attach to the theories and principles of our institutions. There is far more danger of harm than there is hope of good in any radical changes. We do need a better understanding and comprehension of them and a better knowledge of the foundations of government in general Our forefathers came to certain conclusions and decided upon certain courses of action which have been a great blessing to the world. Before we can understand their conclusions we must go back and review the course which they followed. We must think the thoughts which they thought. Their intellectual life centered around the meetinghouse. They were intent upon religious worship. While there were always among them men of deep learning, and later those who had comparatively large possessions, the mind of the people was not so much engrossed in how much they knew, or how much they had, as in how they were going to live. While scantily provided with other literature, there was a wide acquaintance with the Scriptures. Over a period as great as that which measures the existence of our independence they were subject to this discipline not only in their religious life and educational training, but also in their political thought. They were a people who came under the influence of a great spiritual development and acquired a great moral power.

No other theory is adequate to explain or comprehend the Declaration of Independence. It is the product of the spiritual insight of the people. We live in an age of science and of abounding accumulation of material things. These did not create our Declaration. Our Declaration created them. The things of the spirit come first. Unless we cling to that, all our material prosperity, overwhelming though it may appear, will turn to a barren scepter in our grasp. If we are to maintain the great heritage which has been bequeathed to us, we must be like-minded as the fathers who created it. We must not sink into a pagan materialism. We must cultivate the reverence which they had for the things that are holy. We must follow the spiritual and moral leadership which they showed. We must keep replenished, that they may glow with a more compelling flame, the altar fires before which they worshiped.




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