American Elephants


Americans Disapprove the Iran Deal By a 2 to 1 Margin by The Elephant's Child

If you thought possibly that there was something wrong with the “Iran Deal” here it is:

Iran’s ambassador to the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) said the nuclear inspection organization is barred from revealing to the United States any details of deals it has inked with Tehran to inspect its contested nuclear program going forward, according to regional reports.

So America is supposed to sign a “deal” but we are not allowed to know any details? And that is successful negotiating?

The White House did not pursue the nuclear agreement with Iran as an international treaty, because getting U.S. Senate advise and consent for a treaty has “become physically impossible”, Secretary of State John Kerry told lawmakers on Tuesday.

Have you forgotten already, Mr. Kerry, just who the United States Senate is? They are the elected representatives of the American people who are charged by the Constitution with approving any international agreements, usually called “Treaties.” If they don’t approve a treaty, the agreement fails. Pretending that such a deal is somehow not a treaty because the Senate might not approve it is completely absurd.

Americans oppose President Obama’s nuclear deal with Iran’s mullahs by a whopping 57% to 28%. Once the American  people learned that Iran is under no obligation to end its proxy terrorist wars against our troops and our allies (and receives billions of dollars to enhance their effort), and get 24 full days to decide whether they will allow inspectors access, and that there were side agreements that even Congress didn’t get to read, we could safely say that they began to have real doubts. Even 32% of Democrats don’t believe that the agreement will make us safer.

Secretary of State Kerry is not the most convincing witness for the Iran Deal. His insistence that this is the best possible deal, and will prevent Iran getting a nuclear weapons for at least the next 15 minutes or so, is not much of a confidence booster.  Nor does his ability to sell the deal to a dubious Congress create much confidence in his ability as a negotiator, as does his insistence that this is the best deal we could get.

John Hannah of the Foundation for the Defense of Democracies noted that:

Specifically, the president said, Iran’s obligation not to develop nuclear weapons “under the Non-Proliferation Treaty does not go away,” while “the Additional Protocol that they have to sign up for under this deal, which requires a more extensive inspection and verification mechanism … stays in place.” Moreover, the president pointed out that in 15 years, the United States will be “much more knowledgeable about what [Iran’s] capabilities are, much more knowledgeable about what their program is and still in a position to take whatever actions we would take today” to stop any effort by the mullahs to break out to a bomb.
Victor Davis Hanson reminds us of the history of appeasement, and whether comparisons to Munich are appropriate. There is a history and if we do not learn from history — we’re going to be in trouble, big trouble.

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