American Elephants


Does Europe Get Its Due On the World Stage? by The Elephant's Child
July 13, 2018, 8:48 pm
Filed under: Politics | Tags: , ,

europe

The media are full of President Trump’s visit to Europe and to England. They were delighted with the offensive and disrespectful balloon in London, sure that the terrible Trump was going to permanently spoil our relations with the leaders across the pond.

America is a big open country, we hang all our linen out on the clothesline, so to speak, the clean as well as the dirty. Our news appears on the front pages of European newspapers, and our demonstrations on their television. Interestingly, the opposite is not the case. We may hear about big events on the continent, but for the most part, Americans don’t pay much attention. We know that Europe has had an invasion of migrants who cause some trouble, but frankly, we don’t know much about the state of affairs.

Victor Davis Hanson, in his latest essay for the Hoover Institution, clarifies the situation, explaining the big picture. He brings his deep historical knowledge to his evaluation, and it is valuable. Do read the whole thing and save it.

Yet in current foreign policy journals, a constant theme is European leaders who lament that Europe does not get its due on the world stage. Why would that be?

After all, if “Europe” is defined by the membership of the 28-member European Union, then it should easily be the world’s superpower. The European project now has an aggregate population (512 million) that dwarfs that of the United States (326 million). Even its GDP ($20 trillion) is often calibrated as roughly equivalent to or even larger than America’s ($19 trillion).

Historically, European geography has been strategically influential—with windows on the Atlantic, Baltic, and Mediterranean, the ancient maritime nexus of three continents. Rome is the center of Christianity, by far the world’s largest religion. Some of the world’s great nations—Argentina, Australia, Brazil, Canada, Chile, New Zealand, and the United States—were birthed as European colonies. Some two billion people speak European languages, including hundreds of millions outside of Europe whose first language is English, Spanish, Portuguese, or French.

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Democrats Hark Back to William Shakespeare for Inspiration by The Elephant's Child

Three Representatives in the House (Mark Pocan (D-WI), Pramilla Jayapal (D-WA) and Adriano Espaillat (D-NY) introduced legislation to abolish the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE).

House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy (R-CA) confirmed earlier Thursday that he planned to schedule a vote on the bill.

The three Dems said if a vote comes to the floor, they will vote against it. Republicans were delighted with the opportunity to force Democrats to take a difficult vote. A lot of Democrat voters want ICE abolished because they don’t understand what ICE does and assumes they rip innocent children from their mother’s arms. ( No, that’s the Border Patrol) because they’ve seen the pictures of kids in cages (Those were Obama’s cages, not Trump’s). ICE are the police of immigration. They try to remove the illegals who have committed serious crimes from the country, like those who are sex-trafficking children, committing violence or bringing in drugs.

The GOP lawmakers said Democrats should be willing to show their constituents where they actually stand on the issue.

“Democrats have been trying to make July 4th about abolishing ICE, which is a radical, extreme position that would lead to open borders and undermine America’s national security,” House Majority Whip Steve Scalise (R-La.) told The Hill. “I think it’s the wrong approach. I think everyone ought to be on record about where they stand on that issue.”

Republicans have blasted the legislation, arguing eliminating the agency would lead to an influx of human and drug trafficking as well as gang violence, and increase the country’s risk of being subjected to an act of terrorism.

I think this is a perfect example of Shakespeare’s idiom in Hamlet “hoist with his own petard” A petard is a small bomb used to blow up gates and walls when breaching the castle walls.

Shakespeare’s phrase, “hoist with his own petard,” is an idiom that means “to be harmed by one’s own plan to harm someone else” or “to fall into one’s own trap”, implying that one could be lifted (blown) upward by one’s own bomb, or in other words, be foiled by one’s own plan.

A little humor is always welcome, especially if it’s actually funny.




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