American Elephants


Here’s the Background of the Zero-Tolerance Policy at the Border by The Elephant's Child

Andrew Arthur is a Resident Fellow in Law and Policy at the Center for Immigration Studies (cis.org), an American think tank that studies immigration. They identify themselves as pro-legal immigration and anti-illegal immigration. It is an excellent source of dependable information. You can sign up for regular e-mails concerning their latest studies, or just list them with your favorite blogs, when you have questions about what is being reported in the media. And questions are well deserved.

This brief video is bout 3 minutes long. (horrible initial screen) It doesn’t even look interesting, but it is.



Important Voices: by The Elephant's Child

William Voegeli, from The Pity Party:

” In contrast to America, countries like Canada and Australia treat immigration the way Harvard treats college admission or the New England Patriots treat the NFL draft as a way to get the talented that can benefit the institution and keep out the untalented.  Here in America, we increasingly treat immigration as if it were a sacred civil right possessed by 7 billion foreigners.”

Economist Dierdre McCloskey:

In the countries that most enthusiastically embraced capitalism, some two hundred years ago, real per-capita economic growth has increased by 1.5 percent annually. Owing to the miracle of compound interest, this increase has meant a 19-fold increase in living standards over the past two centuries, which, she contends, is a “change in the human condition” that “ranks with the first domestication of plants and animals and the building of the first towns.” … this enormous economic result has a cause that was cultural rather than economic. Humans did not suddenly become more acquisitive or creative. Rather “when people treat the marketers and inventors as having some dignity and liberty, innovation takes hold.” The new respectability of bourgeois life, the belief that the creativity of capitalism’s creative destruction more than offset its destruction, was the decisive attitudinal change that rendered human life in the past two centuries decisively different from what it had been throughout the preceding millennia.




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