American Elephants


Looking Out My 2nd Story Window… by The Elephant's Child
November 17, 2022, 2:57 pm
Filed under: Politics

The photo is of the Cascade mountains, but unfortunately not the view I get from my window. Clear blue sky today, looks like a nice day. The little rain we had seems to have cleared things up. Apparently the forest fires in the Cascades are either out or well under control. My house is on an East-facing hill over a golf course at the bottom of the hill, so I have a pretty good view, even if there is nothing spectacular whatsoever to look at. I have enough of a view to see the weather potential, and get clues as to what is happening in the Cascade mountains to the East.

There are large lakes on both sides of Bellevue. To the West, Lake Washington separates Bellevue from Seattle, with two major bridges, to the East, Lake Samamish is smaller, but still a significant lake. Seattle, on the western side of Lake Washington, lies on a major arm of the Pacific Ocean: Puget Sound, which, of course is salt water, while the two lakes are fresh water.I cannot see the Cascade Range from my window, just get clues. Interesting to think about how our lives have changed with television to show us that which we cannot see first hand.

I have a different view of things, having grown up in the mountains of Idaho. Makes me think of the views of those who grew up on the Great Plains, with no mountains in sight. Can hardly imagine it! I grew up in Idaho, but have lived in California, Arizona, and Oregon as well. Detest California, but surprisingly enjoyed the Arizona desert.

One of my commenters pointed out that Western mountains are “pointy” while most Eastern mountains are “round -topped”. Clearly true, but I had never thought of it that way before. We do have a lot of “pointy” mountains out here, but lots of round-topped ones as well. The Sierras are a formidable mountain range, almost a continuation of our Cascade Range that runs the length of the Western states down through the Sierras. I suspect that Americans mostly are not all that familiar with the basic geography of the United States. There’s always a basic quiz going around online to prove how ignorant we are of our own geography. How many states have you visited (just flying over doesn’t count, I mean really visited)


6 Comments so far
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My baby brother, his wife and their four-year-old recently moved out to Puyallup from Durham, NC. On a clear day, Mt Ranier is straight out from the front door of the house they’re renting. He says it very impressive, and quite beautiful, but more than a little intimidating.

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Comment by Lon Mead

It is a national park, and from the pictures,
full of beautiful hiking trails. As a native Idahoan, I’m inclined to head back to my native state and native mountains., but it is very pretty country, close enough to Tacoma for good shopping without coming up to Seattle.
Puget Sound is readily available and all the islands in one direction and the Cascades in the other. Pretty part of the state. My family came west from Due West, South Carolina. little college town. Never been in that part of the country, except for a Caribbean Cruise former husband’s company sent us on. Hated that!

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Comment by The Elephant's Child

You should come check out East Tennessee/Western North Carolina in the spring. Yes, our mountains are shorter, but not as pointy as your western ones.

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Comment by Lon Mead

My father’s family comes from Due West, South Carolina., Presbyterian minister, Pittsburgh. Oddly enough, turns out my mother’s family comes from Due West as well, though we never knew that when I was growing up. I gather they were all refugees from the Presbyterian battles in Scotland in the 1800’s.

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Comment by The Elephant's Child

P.S. I never thought of our mountains as “pointy” but I guess they are. If you look at a map of Idaho, on the West side there is a large bump caused by the Snake River. I grew up about in the middle of the bump, about 4000 feet elevation, on the Weiser River, a tributary of the Snake River, which is in turn a tributary of the Columbia River. which flows through Portland to the coast.

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Comment by The Elephant's Child

I usually describe your mountains (the Cascades) as pointy, aggressive, and prone to occasionally exploding. I do love them, but I like my round, calm mountains.

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Comment by Lon Mead




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