American Elephants


The Passing Span of the Years –Some of Them by The Elephant's Child
November 6, 2017, 6:19 am
Filed under: England, Environment, Europe, France, History, Immigration, Law, Politics, The United States | Tags:

1066: The Norman Invasion, William the Conqueror, The Battle of Hastings.
1215;  Magna Charta
1348-1350: The Black Death, 1/3 of Europe Died
1350-1600: The Renaissance, Best Weather Known to Man
1227-1453: The Hundred Years War (France, Crecy, Potiers, Jean d’Arc)
1450-1850:The Little Ice Age
1455-1485: Wars of the Roses: Lancaster v. York
1502: The First Watch – telling time
1517: Martin Luther,  1532: Calvin, 1541: John Knox.
The Reformation
1519-1535: Spanish Conquest
1533: Henry VIII leaves Catholic Church Marries Anne Boleyn
1542: First Western Entry to Japan
1588: The Armada
1603: Queen Elizabeth dies
1642-1660: Roundheads v. Cavaliers. Cromwell
1620: Pilgrims land at Plymouth Rock
1630: Winthrop Fleet Arrives in Massachusetts Bay
1675-1678: King Philip’s War or Metacomet’s Rebellion
1773: Boston Tea Party 1775: Paul Revere, Bunker Hill
1760-1791: The American Revolution
1776, July 4: The Declaration of Independence
1787: The Constitution, 1791: The Bill of Rights
1799: Napoleon Bonaparte proclaimed Emperor
1804-1815: The Napoleonic Wars 1815: Waterloo
1846: The Irish Potato Famine
1853:
The Crimean War
1859: Charles Darwin: The Origin of Species
1867: Canada Becomes a Dominion
1899-1902: The Boer War
1903: The Russian Revolution 1918: Nicholas Abdicates

Leaving a lot out, of course. A quick ten centuries,

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The First United States Census Took Place in August 1790 by The Elephant's Child

The first Census in the United States took  place beginning on August 2, 1790.  Although it took months to collect all the data from households, census takers were instructed to collect information as of August 2. In the first census the population of the United States was enumerated to be 3,929,214.

From Gordon S. Wood’s Empire of Liberty

Only 60 percent of the white population of well over three million remained English in ancestry. (1,800,000). 700 thousand of African descent. Tens of thousands of native Indians. All the peoples of Europe were present in the country, 9 percent German, 8 percent were Scots, 6 percent Scots-Irish, 4 percent were Irish, 3 percent Dutch, the remainder: French Swedes, Spanish, and people of unknown ethnicity.

African American Census schedules can be found at ancestry.com  The American Indian Census Rolls beginning in 1885-1940 can be found in the National Archives. There is not a census for every reservation for every year.

The National Census records can be found at the Bureau of the Census: https//www.census.gov



Victor Davis Hanson “How Did the Universities Change So Badly” by The Elephant's Child

We’ve all watched the complete insanity going on in our Universities and wondered how did we get here? Why can’t the college administrators act like grown ups, and send these misbehaving kids home promptly? This one is brief, only 10 minutes.

At Mizzou, enrollment is way down, some dorms had to be closed, and at every other campus where riots and misbehavior took place without consequences, enrollment is down, donations are down, and new student enrollment is down. At Evergreen, George Bridges reportedly had to seek psychological counseling over the summer, and the professor who was attacked won a significant lawsuit. That would seem to be a sign that all is not well in higher education.

I’m not at all sure that they understand it even yet. Parents send their kids off to be educated, not indoctrinated — and at outrageously exorbitant cost.



Who Said the Economy Could Not Return to 3% Growth? by The Elephant's Child

I frequently mutter something to the effect that Democrats don’t understand economics, that’s why they are Democrats. Democrats were saying that there was no chance of returning the economy to 3% growth, but as the media have once again reported, the economy “surprisingly” grew at a 3% pace in the third quarter, despite the impact of three major hurricanes. Most economists had reduced their estimates to just above 1% because of the impact of Hurricanes Harvey and Irma on the economy. Those who keep expecting a big slowdown should look at what’s really going on.

The IBD/TIPP Economic Optimism Index, the Conference Board’s Consumer Confidence Index, the National Association of Manufacturers survey and the Institute for Supply Management all report stronger optimism and rising factory output. Overall optimism hasn’t been this high in over a decade.

The current unemployment rate at 4.2% is the lowest since before the financial crisis. Total employment has jumped more than 2.2 million since Trump entered office. Even the broadest U.S. unemployment measure, so-called U6, now stands at 8.3% — its lowest since June of 2007.

Meanwhile, all major stock market indexes are up strongly since Trump’s unexpected win last November, with the Dow Jones industrial average breaching 23,000 for the first time this month. The stock market, as we’ve said before, is a reliable if imperfect predictor of future economic activity. Its message today is unequivocal: Expect more of the same.

Donald Trump has embarked on a sweeping round of deregulations in recent history. He got rid of Obama’s disastrous “Clean Power Plan,” and the Paris Climate Accord, which did nothing whatsoever for the climate and sent a lot of U.S. money to emerging nations to solve their climate problems. He is now removing the restrictions that Obama put on federal energy lands. Oil is flowing through the Dakota Access pipeline, and with the fracking revolution the United States will be a global energy powerhouse again.

Democrats are all about control, which means that they try to regulate everything. And regulation means extra costs, inefficient ways of doing things, silly extra requirements all of which slow an economy down. When excess regulation is removed, companies are encouraged to invest in new equipment, plants and training, and to hire more workers. That’s what makes an economy grow. Tax reform gives businesses more of their own money to  invest in growth.

The Federal Register, the bible of federal rules, came in at a record high 97,110 pages of rules under President Obama. Trump has already knocked it down the 45,678 pages, and he’s just getting started. Many of his new rules in the pipeline are about getting rid of old regulations.

Wayne Crews, who is CEI’s regulatory analyst, estimates that the economic cost to the economy is $2 trillion, or roughly 12% of  current GDP. Obama’s regulatory state has been especially hard on small businesses. I can name a significant number of small businesses who disappeared during the Obama administration.

 



In 1825, The Erie Canal Opened, made New York the Chief Atlantic Port. by The Elephant's Child
October 31, 2017, 6:27 am
Filed under: Domestic Policy, Economy, History, The United States | Tags: ,

The period from 1817 to 1844 has been referred to as the Canal Era, in which some 4,000 miles of canals were constructed at a cost of $200 million. The earliest and best were built by private businesses such as the Middlesex Canal in Massachusetts and the Santee and Cooper in South Carolina.

The Erie Canal was the most famous—its completion so anticipated that it collected an advance $1 million in tolls. It was 40′ wide, 4′ deep and 363 miles long, all bordered with towpaths, 86 locks to raise and lower boats 565′.

New York State, The Improved Canal System — from: The Canal System of New York State / Charles L. Cadle — Re-issued and revised (Albany : J.B. Lyon Co., printers, 1921)

The painting at the top is by George Harvey Pitsford, 1837
Courtesy of the Memorial Art Museum University of Rochester

And There Were Songs

.Oh the Er-i-e is a-rising………………….I’ve got a mule,and her name is Sal
.And the gin is a-getting low………………Fifteen miles on the Erie Canal
.I scarcely think……………………..;;;;…..She’s a good old worker,
.We’ll get a drink……………………….,….And a good old Pal
Till we get to Buffalo……………………….Fifteen miles on the Erie Canal
Till We get to Buffalo………………………We hauled some barges in our day
………………………………………………Filled with lumber, coal and hay
………………………………………………And we know ev’ry inch of the way
………………………………………………From Albany to Buffalo

………………………………………………Low bridge! Ev’rybody down!
………………………………………………Low bridge, we’re coming to a town
………………………………………………And you’ll always know your neighbor
………………………………………………You’ll always know your pal
………………………………………………If you’ve ever navigated on the Erie Canal

 



A Wake-Up Call for Our Schools! by The Elephant's Child

At the University of Wisconsin, Madison, during a 2016 Columbus Day protest conducted by Wunk Sheek, a Native American student organization, activists hosted a die-in near a statue of Abraham Lincoln, claiming he was complicit in the murder of Native Americans.

“Everyone thinks of Lincoln as the great, you know, freer of slaves, but let’s be real: He owned slaves, and as natives, we want people to know that he ordered the execution of native men,” said one of the protesters.

It’s a little more complicated than that, but the point is more that when professors complain that new students don’t know anything and are unfamiliar with history, they’re right. And this should be a major wake-up call to university officials that they are shortchanging their students in the history department. And to our public schools who are graduating students ignorant of basic history.

From Thomas Sowell:

Of all the tragic facts about the history of slavery, the most astonishing to an American today is that, although slavery was a worldwide institution for thousands of years, nowhere in the world was slavery a controversial issue prior to the 18th century. People of every race and color were enslaved – and enslaved others. White people were still being bought and sold as slaves in the Ottoman Empire, decades after American blacks were freed.

Everyone hated the idea of being a slave but few had any qualms about enslaving others. Slavery was just not an issue, not even among intellectuals, much less among political leaders, until the 18th century – and then it was an issue only in Western civilization. Among those who turned against slavery in the 18th century were George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, Patrick Henry and other American leaders. You could research all of the 18th century Africa or Asia or the Middle East without finding any comparable rejection of slavery there. But who is singled out for scathing criticism today? American leaders of the 18th century.

Deciding that slavery was wrong was much easier than deciding what to do with millions of people from another continent, of another race, and without any historical preparation for living as free citizens in a society like that of the United States, where they were 20 percent of the population.

And from a National Geographic article titled “21st Century Slaves”:

There are an estimated 27 million men, women, and children in the world who are enslaved — physically confined or restrained and forced to work, or controlled through violence, or in some way treated as property.

Therefore, there are more slaves today than were seized from Africa in four centuries of the trans-Atlantic slave trade [11 million total, and about 450,000, or about 4% of the total, who were brought to the United States]. The modern commerce in humans rivals illegal drug trafficking in its global reach—and in the destruction of lives.



Yoo Hoo, Seattle City Council by The Elephant's Child

From Economist Mark J. Perry at AEI:

Seattle City Council: Do higher prices reduce demand  or not?




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