American Elephants

The Dark Ages Weren’t Really Dark! by The Elephant's Child

Medieval, the Dark Ages, a time of plagues and starvation, and gloom. Where did we get those ideas? And what was the real truth? Here’s a little historical correction for us.

A Comment on Today’s Culture: Historically Inaccurate, but Pointed. by The Elephant's Child


Honda “Paper” by The Elephant's Child
October 4, 2015, 7:05 am
Filed under: Art, Entertainment, Free Markets, Freedom, Heartwarming, Humor, Japan | Tags: , ,

Advertising that makes you pay attention! Very, very , very clever.

(h/t: vanderleun)

The American West in the 1860s and 1870s by The Elephant's Child

Inspired by the plight of a small American Indian tribe, I thought I’d repost a photographic essay of the American West in the 1860s and 1870s, because the pictures are quite interesting, and the news of the day isn’t. I’m really tired of talking about Hillary and her disreputable past and present.

Pah-Ute (Paiute) Indian group, near Cedar, Utah in 1872

The Atlantic has done another of their wonderful photo essays: in the 1860s and 70s, photographer Timothy O’Sullivan created some of the best-known images in American History. He covered the U.S. Civil War, and afterwards joined a number of expeditions organized by the federal government to help document the new frontiers in the American West. The teams were comprised of soldiers, scientists, artists and photographers. Their task was to discover the best ways to take advantage of the untapped resources of the region. O’Sullivan had an outstanding eye, and strong work ethic, and returned with beautiful photographs that captured the vastness and beauty of the American West in a way that would later influence Ansel Adams and thousands of photographers who admired O’Sullivan’s work.

“A Picture Is Worth A Thousand Words” by The Elephant's Child

RAMclr-031015-little-league-IBD-COLOR-FINAL147.gif.cmsEspecially in the hands of Michael Ramirez, political cartoonist extraordinaire, at Investors. Follow his work, he always has something important to say.

40 Photographs From the Past, Brought Up-To-Date With Color. by The Elephant's Child
February 3, 2015, 5:06 pm
Filed under: Art, History, News | Tags: , ,


A new trend has emerged, of colorizing black and white photographs from the past. The colorizing is well done in the examples I have seen. The website that presents these 40 examples says that colorizing photographs from the late 1800s and early 1900s “changes their appearance from something historic and different, into a scene from today,” “changing our perception of history dramatically.”

They are very interesting, and do look more like our world of today, but I don’t know that they change our perception of history at all. I don’t find black and white photos difficult to understand, perhaps because I’ve always had family albums in black and white, and family pictures on the wall, and remain untroubled by their lack of color.

Do take a few moments to go through these. Doesn’t take long. See what you think. Do these people come alive once colored, does it change your ideas of history? I’m more interested in seeing pictures of things from the past never seen before, colorized or not.

The Dark Ages? They Really Weren’t That Dark! by The Elephant's Child

Professor Anthony Esolen for Prager University. We’ve been told that the Middle Ages, also known as the Dark Ages, were characterized by oppression ignorance and backwardness in areas like human rights, science, health and the arts? We have been misled.

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