American Elephants


Inebriated With Their State’s Storied History, Californians… by The Elephant's Child

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I lived in California for a number of years, and absolutely loathe the place, so I’m inclined to enjoy the news from the state. I believe I mentioned that Governor Jerry Brown is planning to launch California’s own climate satellite to monitor climate-change pollutants.  I can remember the days when one dressed up to go into “the city.” Now the streets of San Francisco are so fouled with feces that  tourist organizations advocate avoiding the place.

As a state run by Democrats, California has the Democrat illusion that control of the population is a desirable thing. They are a sanctuary state, welcome illegals, and ban plastic drinking straws to save whatever sea life is bothered by them. Assembly Bill 1884 bans dine-in restaurants from automatically providing plastic straws to customers. Plastic straws can be provided if the customer requests one. Violators will be fined $25 per day.

Jerry Brown has just signed the nation’s toughest net neutrality measure, requiring internet providers to maintain a level playing field online. The move prompted an immediate lawsuit by the Trump administration. The new law prohibits internet providers from blocking or slowing data based on content or from favoring websites or video streams from companies that pay extra.  From what I understand, the new regulations protect consumers, but the tech companies don’t like them, but the whole thing is a bit beyond my pay grade.

Not to be outdone in their concern for the health of the climate, California has adopted a 100 percent renewable energy goal — a law mandating that 100 percent of the electricity in the state will come from emissions-free sources by 2045. I don’t think he means that they are going to build a lot of nuclear plants—he means wind and solar. Unfortunately wind and solar cannot produce dependable energy. Essentially, he is declaring war on carbon dioxide, what we exhale every time we breathe. The environmental costs of wind and solar are huge, and a major factor in the state’s high electricity rates. But neither produce dependable energy, and not in high enough quantity to service the population’s needs. Natural gas and nuclear would be a better choice, but putting nuclear plants on top of the San Andreas fault is probably not a good idea. Wind turbines kill a lot of birds, as do solar arrays. The turbines chop them up, and the solar cells fry them.

Such global warming as there is seems to be caused by the action of the sun. The small increase in carbon dioxide in the atmosphere is greening the earth. Here’s satellite evidence for planetary greening caused by increasing carbon dioxide:

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These are trends in leaf area around the earth. Which feed hungry people around the world.
Civil Rights groups are suing the state because the climate regulations fall most heavily on those who can afford higher energy costs the least. California has the highest poverty rate in the nation.

And last but not least, (hee hee) San Francisco has passed an ordinance requiring public artwork to depict more women. Taxpayers, including women, will be stuck with the bill in this ridiculously expensive city. The new rule also requires the Arts Commission to put up a statue of Maya Angelou, who was once a San Francisco resident in the city’s main library.

When I lived in a San Francisco apartment briefly, about 5 or 6 blocks from the beach, there was a tidal wave alert. San Francisco residents rushed down to the beach to see the tidal wave.  (fortunately it was a dud. )



The Best and Worst States for Business, and What They Have in Common by The Elephant's Child

The newly-created McGee Report from Fayetteville State University is an annual report on the Best and Worst States for Business. “The fifty states are ranked based on the extent to which they facilitate business creation and expansion. This study incorporated the data collected from five other studies, which included the examination of hundreds of variables. Utah was found to be the most business friendly state; California was least business friendly. States that voted Republican in the 2016 presidential election tended to be more business friendly than states that voted Democratic.” Social justice at work.

Reading the comments is almost as much fun as the list. The commenters seem to be mostly Californian. In San Francisco, you can rent a bunk bed, sharing a room with several others for $1,200 a month. The place packs in 25 people and rent runs from $1,250 to $1,900.

Three Democrat representatives have introduced a bill that would punish any contractors who dare to work on the border wall by withdrawing any investments in their companies by state-controlled pension funds.

California’s boondoggle bullet train was initially budgeted at $32 billion and the price tag is now up to $68 billion (which the taxpayers are on the hook for), and the initial stretch of track, the easiest to build part of the entire 700 mile route is now $10 billion, and not a single mile has been laid. Just seven years behind schedule. The governor is begging for help, but the Trump Department of  Transportation has  put the brakes on. Jerry Brown’s California suffers the nation’s highest housing prices, largest percentage of people in or near poverty of any state and an exodus of middle-income, middle-aged people. Job growth is increasingly concentrated in low-wage sectors.

The state is the front line for Sanctuary Cities, is zealously fighting natural climate change, their schools are lousy, and they are the worst state in the country for their business climate. Good on social justice though.

Do take a look at the charts. Besides the McGee rankings, it includes the ranking from Forbes, Tax Foundation, Institute for Legal Reform and the Cato Institute. If you scroll down through the comments you will come to one gentleman who did read the whole thing, including how the rankings were calculated — who actually lives in California, and wishes he didn’t. I’ve lived in both the Bay Area and in Southern California, and couldn’t wait to leave.




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