American Elephants


Here Is a Wonderful Edition of Uncommon Knowledge from the Hoover Institution by The Elephant's Child

Here’s a remarkable video of Uncommon Knowledge with Peter Robinson from the Hoover Institution, featuring former Secretary of State George Schultz, John Cogan, Terry Anderson and Lee Ohanian. Four economists to talk about the major improvements that happened in the United States between 1919 and 2019. There were momentous improvements affecting all of our lives and our prosperity, inventions, the Great Depression, the Holocaust, World War II, the underlying institutions. prosperity, private property, the rule of law, free markets and what they mean. The role of immigration, the role of government, and attracting talent. You’ll learn a lot of History and a lot of Economics.

This was just published on August 26, 2019. It’s long, but worth every minute. You will learn a lot. Leadership, the uses of government, Socialism illustrated, American institutions, the Great Depression, economic history, a hugely rewarding discussion. You will learn about incentives, taxes, policies and why they matter. You will enjoy it,really. Enlarge it to full screen. You might want to keep a copy so you can listen more than once. I know that I will.

ADDENDUM: Do take special note of Terry Anderson’s visit to an Indian Reservation and the discussion of private property, with a devastating account of socialism thrown in for the benefit of our ignorant college students.



The Long, Long Story of ClimateGate and Dr. Michael Mann by The Elephant's Child

mann_treering

Back when today’s environmentalists suddenly became anxious about the climate, government agencies began giving grants to those scientists who were studying the climate seriously, and coming up with information to protect the government officials who might be accused of not tending to business and protecting the climate of the earth. ‘

Obviously the scientists who got the good-sized grants were those who could write a good grant proposal, for getting a grant enhanced the prestige of the scientist and the university where he taught, and meant new equipment and perhaps a raise, and maybe even an assistant.  So naturally there was a flurry of grant proposals churned out. Then they had to start producing useful science. Many turned to the computer programs used by Wall Street to predict what the market was going to do. So they entered what they knew about climate, but there was an enormous amount they didn’t know, so they put in what seemed likely, and what they thought was probable and a few wild guesses, and started predicting what the climate would do 20 or 50 years hence. [Please remember that this is a non-scientific estimate of what was going on by a sheer amateur observer.] The point is that there was a lot they just didn’t have any information about, like the action of clouds, and some things that they assumed were correct, like the temperatures at official thermometer sites (though many were located next to air conditioning outlets and heat-reflecting concrete walls, and even next to trash burners.) In other words, the official temperature records were vastly overestimating the warming.

Anthony Watts, proprietor of the valued website wattsupwiththat.com, meteorologist and former TV weatherman, became suspicious, and asked his viewers to take photographs of the official thermometer locations, and since many were located where factors other than weather were influencing the recorded temperatures. That’s when the “heat island” notion became common.

Michael Mann (Penn State) came up with was was called “the hockey-stick” graph. Envision a hockey stick. Goes along straight and then suddenly jogs straight up. That’s what his climate graph showed that the heat of the planet was going to do. That got a lot of attention,. Naturally it was called “ClimateGate”) Mann’s graph was featured news, Mann became a recognized scientist, with all the hoopla that entails. Dr. Tim Bell, climate skeptic, from B.C. suggested that Mann was exaggerating and making phony claims, as did Mark Steyn as a journalist. Mann sued for defamation. How dare you criticize my famous hockey stick graph. And the case has dragged on in Canadian courts for nine years. and Dr. Tim Ball won,  Michael Mann deservedly lost and has to pay Dr. Ball’s court costs. Here is Anthony Watt’s story on the whole long, long ClimateGate battle. More interesting because he has long been a participant. And here is the report from Marc Morano at Climate Depot. We are pleased.

If you can, take the time to prowl around wattsupwiththat.com and climatedepot.com. These are excellent websites that will reward your visits.



Thomas Sowell On the Myths of Economic Inequality by The Elephant's Child

It’s Sunday, so perhaps you have more time to watch a little longer intellectual discussion of capitalism and freedom from Thomas Sowell, brilliant as usual. A splendid commentary on the general conversation out there today.

Sowell discusses his early life as a high school dropout and his first full-time job as a Western Union messenger delivering telegrams. He admits to flirting with Marxism in his early twenties as he first tried to grapple with the housing inequality he saw across the neighborhoods of New York City. Marxism, he says, was the only explanation he could find at the time. He went on to serve in the Marine Corps before continuing his education in economics at Harvard and earning a master’s at Columbia and a PhD at the University of Chicago.

Sowell’s first job after his receiving his PhD in economics was working for the Department of Labor, and he says it was there that he realized Marxism was not the answer. He argues that the government has its own institutional interests in inequality that cannot be explained through Marxism. He began to be discouraged by Marxism and the government in general and began searching for better economic ideas and solutions (the free market).

Robinson and Sowell discuss Sowell’s written works, his ideas of racial and economic inequality, the state of the United States today, and much more.



Two Hundred and Forty Three Years of Freedom by The Elephant's Child

President Trump’s Fourth of July speech was excellent. Democrats extended every effort to disparage, demean and dump on the occasion, but it was a very good, very patriotic speech from the Lincoln Memorial, honoring the service of all branches of our military who have served and saved the nation over the years since our founding. I have seven ancestors who fought in the Revolution, and two died, one was a leader of a group of Minute Men who was killed at the Battle of Bridgeport, and a great (6th I think) grandmother who was killed when a troop of Hessians broke into the house looking for her husband. She was still abed recovering from childbirth, and so frightened she jumped out of the window, fell into the well, and drowned.

During the speech as each branch of the service was honored, there was a flyover from that branch of the service, ending with the Blue Angels.We usually see them once a year here at Seafair, and the cranks complain about the noise, and the rest celebrate as the “sound of freedom.” They always put on a spectacular close formation show.

For those of you who might have missed it:

It was a speech of national pride, a celebration of America, and not political at all. Unfortunately,celebrating America has become political.

And the unfortunate campaign among the Democrats for their party’s nomination seems to have devolved into the idea that the nomination will go to whoever can come up with the biggest insult to President Trump. Strange indeed, but that seems to be where we are.



Judicial Watch Looks Beyond the Headlines! by The Elephant's Child

This amazing video from Judicial Watch was like sitting down with a bunch of well-informed insiders and getting answers to most of the questions I had, and some I hadn’t thought of. Judicial Watch is a wonderful organization that works hard at forcing the federal government to fulfill their requirement to be reasonably transparent. They sue.  They take one department after another to court to get the information that is being withheld. I would love to see a list of the things that we know about only because Judicial Watch has been on the case.

We have just had an attempted coup, with one of our political parties attempting to get rid of a president they are afraid of, that they don’t like, because he’s on to them. He knows how crooked they are and wants to know why they are attacking every good thing he is trying to do for the country and the American people.

It’s fairly long, but broken up in modest segments so you can stop conveniently should you wish. But do watch it. You will be a better informed citizen.



A Mother’s Work Is Never Done! by American Elephant
May 12, 2019, 4:40 am
Filed under: Heartwarming | Tags: , , ,

funny-pictures-mothers-day-classic-gif-sisyphus-mama1

A mother’s work is never done, and mothers never get all the thanks they truly, richly deserve. This image bears a striking resemblance to the job my mother had to do, and she did it magnificently, courageously, and lovingly.

Thank you to the greatest Mom in the world — mine! Happy Mother’s Day! I love you!



Saving Endangered Species in the World’s Zoos by The Elephant's Child

This is the Cincinnati Zoo & Botanical Garden’s little “Peanut”. He (or she) is  a Tamandua, who was born December 20, 2018. His name is “Mani” which means peanut. The Tamanduas are also called “lesser anteaters.” They have long snouts to sniff out ant, termite and bee colonies. Long claws enable it to dig into nests and a long sticky tongue lets it lick up the insects.  A single Tamandua can eat up to 9,000 ants in a single day! They are native to Spanish speaking countries. They didn’t say how they provide that many ants.

Here’s a wonderful website for days when you are finding the news too depressing. http://www.zooborns.com. Zoos around the world are engaged in helping to preserve endangered species. The website shows off the babies, and often their parent as well. Great fun, cute babies, and you are introduced to all sorts of animals and birds that are new to you. Fun site to prowl around. Enjoy.




%d bloggers like this: